CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

(757) 576-1841


    Immigration Law Frequently Asked Questions

    I am the spouse of a United States citizen, am I eligible for a green card?

    Yes, you are eligible to begin the process of becoming a lawful permanent resident or green card holder. Your United States citizen spouse must first file a visa petition on your behalf with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. Once the petition is approved you may file an application for adjustment of status to a lawful permanent resident.


    I recently received my green card, how can I bring my parents to this country to live permanently?

    If you are a lawful permanent resident (green card holder), you are not eligible to petition to bring your parents to live permanently in the United States. Only United States citizens of at least 21 years old are eligible to petition to bring their parents to live and work permanently in the United States.

    As a lawful permanent resident, you may file a family-based petition for your spouse and unmarried son or daughter of any age. Once the petition is approved your family members may file an application for adjustment of status to a lawful permanent resident.


    What family members do the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services consider immediate relatives?

    Immediate relatives of a United States citizen are the spouse, parent and unmarried child under age 21.


    I entered the United States illegally, but have since married a United States citizen, am I eligible to get a green card?

    No, a person entering the United States illegally may not adjust their status to a lawful permanent resident even if he/she marries a United States citizen or becomes an immediate relative.


    My fiancée lives overseas, how do I bring her to the United States?

    If your fiancée is not a citizen of the United States and you plan to get married in the United States, then you must file a petition with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services on behalf of your fiancée.

    After the petition is approved, your fiancée must obtain a visa issued at a U.S. Embassy or consulate abroad. The marriage must take place within 90 days of your fiancée entering the United States. If the marriage does not take place within 90 days or your fiancée marries someone other than you, your fiancée will be required to leave the United States.


    I entered the United States illegally when I was five years old. I have graduated from high school and want to enlist in the military. How can I joint the military?

    Unfortunately you are not eligible to join the military because you do not have legal presence. However, hope is on the horizon. Congress is considering the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act which would provide immigration relief to a select group of students and allow them to become permanent residents if they came to the United States as children (under the age of 16), are long-term U.S. residents (5 years or more), have good moral character, and attend an institution of higher learning or enlist in the military for at least two years. You can help in getting the DREAM Act passed by letting your congress members hear from you. Locate your member of congress at the United States Senate or the United States House of Representatives.


    The Law Office of Natalie Driver Womack, PLC

    6477 College Park Square 202

    Virginia Beach, VA 23464

    (757) 576-1841

    ndwlaw@usa.com


    The Law Office of Natalie Driver Womack, PLC provides comprehensive immigration legal services to clients who dream of making a new life in America. We are located in Virginia Beach Virginia, yet we represent clients nationally and internationally.